Alvernia Studios interiors.

"Warsaw Rising" is the world’s first feature film made entirely from documentary materials. It tells the story of the Warsaw Rising of 1944 through the eyes of two young reporters, witnesses to insurgent fighting. It uses authentic newsreels filmed in August of 1944. Applying modern technology methods of colorization and audio reconstruction and ensuring the cooperation of the best artists, the "Warsaw Rising" has no equal.

Six hours of original newsreel footage from the Warsaw Rising of 1944, six months of work, a team of militaria, clothing and architecture consultants, urban planners, Warsaw experts and historians, 1000 of colour editing consulting hours, 1200 shots, 1440 hours of colorizing and reconstruction, 112.000 selected frames, 648.000 minutes of reconstruction, 22.971.520 megabytes of data — these are only some numbers which help appreciate the enormous effort and means dedicated to the “Warsaw Rising” project. The result is a 90 minute completely restored coloured and extremely touching film, which shows the Warsaw Rising with unparalleled realism.

source: www.youtube.com/user/1944pl

normaltd:

Dzieciństwo jest jak zatarte oblicze na złotej monecie, która dźwięczy czysto.

- Tadeusz Różewicz

zebrartur:

This space station is actually Alvernia Studios, a film studio outside Kraków, Poland. The inside also looks like a space station straight out of Alien or Star Wars, with bone-like metallic structures and sliding doors commanded by fingerprint.

(via galeriakrakow)

Grief is not linear. People kept telling me that once this happened or that passed, everything would be better. Some people gave me one year to grieve. They saw grief as a straight line, with a beginning, middle, and end. But it is not linear. It is disjointed. One day you are acting almost like a normal person. You maybe even manage to take a shower. Your clothes match. You think the autumn leaves look pretty, or enjoy the sound of snow crunching under your feet. Then a song, a glimpse of something, or maybe even nothing sends you back into the hole of grief. It is not one step forward, two steps back. It is a jumble. It is hours that are all right, and weeks that aren’t. Or it is good days and bad days. Or it is the weight of sadness making you look different to others and nothing helps.
Ann Hood, Comfort; A Journey Through Grief (via theprimroseproject)

(via dianebluegreen)

explore-blog:

Susan Sontag on beauty vs. interestingness – fantastic read

by incidentalcomics:

Understanding Poetry

Happy National Poetry Month! This comic was inspired by one of my favorite poems, "The New Poetry Handbook" by Mark Strand. This month on Incidental Comics, I’ll be exploring the world of poetry. A place, as Marianne Moore famously said, of  ”imaginary gardens with real toads in them.”

(via thegirlandherbooks)

nypl:

Librarians in literature are awesome. (Perhaps not as awesome as librarians in real life, but still pretty durn awesome)

ohmyfreakinggodric:

I’m really curious about what the distribution of tumblr users looks like worldwide…

Australasia  Central America  North America  South America  Africa  Asia  (Antarctica???)

(via mad-smikkelsen)

amandaonwriting:

World Book Day or World Book and Copyright Day (also known as International Day of the Book or World Book Days) is a yearly event on 23 April, organized by UNESCO to promote reading, publishing and copyright. It is hoped that World Book and Copyright Day will increase people’s understanding of copyright laws and other measures to protect intellectual copyright.

In the United Kingdom, the day is instead recognised on the first Thursday in March.

World Book Day was celebrated for the first time on 23 April 1995. The date is symbolic for world literature. Cervantes, Shakespeare and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega all died on 23 April 1616. 

23 April has also been taken as Shakespeare’s birthday (he was baptised on 26 April 1564, and his actual date of birth is unknown). This year, 2014, marks William Shakespeare’s 450th Birthday.

The Top 12 Shakespeare Quotes

  1. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves. (Julius Caesar)
  2. To be, or not to be: that is the question. (Hamlet)
  3. The course of true love never did run smooth. (A Midsummer Night’s Dream)
  4. If I lose mine honour, I lose myself. (Antony and Cleopatra)
  5. All the world ‘s a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts. (As You Like It)
  6. Now is the winter of our discontent. (Richard III)
  7. Brevity is the soul of wit. (Hamlet)
  8. Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ‘em. (Twelfth Night)
  9. Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.  (All’s Well That Ends)
  10. Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow. (Romeo and Juliet)
  11. But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve. (Othello)
  12. There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy. (Hamlet)

by Amanda Patterson

(via thegirlandherbooks)

theparisreview:

“He tried to write One Hundred Years early on. At the beginning he called it his mamotreto [bulky notebook]. It was not spoken of; he could not write it. He knew the novel needed a writer with more experience, so he waited until the day he became the writer capable of writing One Hundred Years. It has to do with command of technique. You need a great deal of technique to write a novel like that. He knows the tale; he has the characters and storyline; but he couldn’t write it. You have a novel that has to be typewritten, but you can’t type, so you have to wait until you learn to type it up; the novel is there, waiting.”
Read part three of Silvana Paternostro’s oral biography of Gabriel García Márquez.

theparisreview:

“He tried to write One Hundred Years early on. At the beginning he called it his mamotreto [bulky notebook]. It was not spoken of; he could not write it. He knew the novel needed a writer with more experience, so he waited until the day he became the writer capable of writing One Hundred Years. It has to do with command of technique. You need a great deal of technique to write a novel like that. He knows the tale; he has the characters and storyline; but he couldn’t write it. You have a novel that has to be typewritten, but you can’t type, so you have to wait until you learn to type it up; the novel is there, waiting.”

Read part three of Silvana Paternostro’s oral biography of Gabriel García Márquez.